Meitnerium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Meitnerium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Specific heat of Meitnerium is — J/g K.

Latent Heat of Fusion of Meitnerium is — kJ/mol.

Latent Heat of Vaporization of Meitnerium is — kJ/mol.

Specific Heat

Specific heat, or specific heat capacity, is a property related to internal energy that is very important in thermodynamics. The intensive properties cv and cp are defined for pure, simple compressible substances as partial derivatives of the internal energy u(T, v) and enthalpy h(T, p), respectively:

Specific Heat at Constant Volume and Constant Pressure

Table of specific heat capacitieswhere the subscripts v and p denote the variables held fixed during differentiation. The properties cv and cp are referred to as specific heats(or heat capacities) because under certain special conditions they relate the temperature change of a system to the amount of energy added by heat transfer. Their SI units are J/kg K or J/mol K.

Different substances are affected to different magnitudes by the addition of heat. When a given amount of heat is added to different substances, their temperatures increase by different amounts.

Heat capacity is an extensive property of matter, meaning it is proportional to the size of the system. Heat capacity C has the unit of energy per degree or energy per kelvin. When expressing the same phenomenon as an intensive property, the heat capacity is divided by the amount of substance, mass, or volume, thus the quantity is independent of the size or extent of the sample.

specific heat - heat capacity

 

Latent Heat of Vaporization

Phase changes - enthalpy of vaporization

In general, when a material changes phase from solid to liquid, or from liquid to gas a certain amount of energy is involved in this change of phase. In case of liquid to gas phase change, this amount of energy is known as the enthalpy of vaporization, (symbol ∆Hvap; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of vaporization or heat of evaporation. As an example, see the figure, which descibes phase transitions of water.

Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the gas (the pΔV work). When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of vaporization is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place.

Latent Heat of Fusion

In case of solid to liquid phase change, the change in enthalpy required to change its state is known as the enthalpy of fusion, (symbol ∆Hfus; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of fusion. Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the system (the pΔV work).

The liquid phase has a higher internal energy than the solid phase. This means energy must be supplied to a solid in order to melt it and energy is released from a liquid when it freezes, because the molecules in the liquid experience weaker intermolecular forces and so have a higher potential energy (a kind of bond-dissociation energy for intermolecular forces).

The temperature at which the phase transition occurs is the melting point.

When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of fusion is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place. By convention, the pressure is assumed to be 1 atm (101.325 kPa) unless otherwise specified.

heat of fusion and vaporization

Meitnerium – Properties

ElementMeitnerium
Atomic Number109
SymbolMt
Element CategoryTransition Metal
Phase at STPSynthetic
Atomic Mass [amu]268
Density at STP [g/cm3]
Electron Configuration[Rn] 5f14 6d7 7s2 ?
Possible Oxidation States
Electron Affinity [kJ/mol]
Electronegativity [Pauling scale]
1st Ionization Energy [eV]
Year of Discovery1982
DiscovererArmbruster, Paula & Muenzenberg, Dr. Gottfried
Thermal properties
Melting Point [Celsius scale]
Boiling Point [Celsius scale]
Thermal Conductivity [W/m K]
Specific Heat [J/g K]
Heat of Fusion [kJ/mol]
Heat of Vaporization [kJ/mol]

 

Meitnerium in Periodic Table

Hydro­gen1HHe­lium2He
Lith­ium3LiBeryl­lium4BeBoron5BCarbon6CNitro­gen7NOxy­gen8OFluor­ine9FNeon10Ne
So­dium11NaMagne­sium12MgAlumin­ium13AlSili­con14SiPhos­phorus15PSulfur16SChlor­ine17ClArgon18Ar
Potas­sium19KCal­cium20CaScan­dium21ScTita­nium22TiVana­dium23VChrom­ium24CrManga­nese25MnIron26FeCobalt27CoNickel28NiCopper29CuZinc30ZnGallium31GaGerma­nium32GeArsenic33AsSele­nium34SeBromine35BrKryp­ton36Kr
Rubid­ium37RbStront­ium38SrYttrium39YZirco­nium40ZrNio­bium41NbMolyb­denum42MoTech­netium43TcRuthe­nium44RuRho­dium45RhPallad­ium46PdSilver47AgCad­mium48CdIndium49InTin50SnAnti­mony51SbTellur­ium52TeIodine53IXenon54Xe
Cae­sium55CsBa­rium56BaLan­thanum57La1 asteriskHaf­nium72HfTanta­lum73TaTung­sten74WRhe­nium75ReOs­mium76OsIridium77IrPlat­inum78PtGold79AuMer­cury80HgThallium81TlLead82PbBis­muth83BiPolo­nium84PoAsta­tine85AtRadon86Rn
Fran­cium87FrRa­dium88RaActin­ium89Ac1 asteriskRuther­fordium104RfDub­nium105DbSea­borgium106SgBohr­ium107BhHas­sium108HsMeit­nerium109MtDarm­stadtium110DsRoent­genium111RgCoper­nicium112CnNihon­ium113NhFlerov­ium114FlMoscov­ium115McLiver­morium116LvTenness­ine117TsOga­nesson118Og
1 asteriskCerium58CePraseo­dymium59PrNeo­dymium60NdProme­thium61PmSama­rium62SmEurop­ium63EuGadolin­ium64GdTer­bium65TbDyspro­sium66DyHol­mium67HoErbium68ErThulium69TmYtter­bium70YbLute­tium71Lu
1 asteriskThor­ium90ThProtac­tinium91PaUra­nium92UNeptu­nium93NpPluto­nium94PuAmeri­cium95AmCurium96CmBerkel­ium97BkCalifor­nium98CfEinstei­nium99EsFer­mium100FmMende­levium101MdNobel­ium102NoLawren­cium103Lr



Darmstadtium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Darmstadtium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Specific heat of Darmstadtium is — J/g K.

Latent Heat of Fusion of Darmstadtium is — kJ/mol.

Latent Heat of Vaporization of Darmstadtium is — kJ/mol.

Specific Heat

Specific heat, or specific heat capacity, is a property related to internal energy that is very important in thermodynamics. The intensive properties cv and cp are defined for pure, simple compressible substances as partial derivatives of the internal energy u(T, v) and enthalpy h(T, p), respectively:

Specific Heat at Constant Volume and Constant Pressure

Table of specific heat capacitieswhere the subscripts v and p denote the variables held fixed during differentiation. The properties cv and cp are referred to as specific heats(or heat capacities) because under certain special conditions they relate the temperature change of a system to the amount of energy added by heat transfer. Their SI units are J/kg K or J/mol K.

Different substances are affected to different magnitudes by the addition of heat. When a given amount of heat is added to different substances, their temperatures increase by different amounts.

Heat capacity is an extensive property of matter, meaning it is proportional to the size of the system. Heat capacity C has the unit of energy per degree or energy per kelvin. When expressing the same phenomenon as an intensive property, the heat capacity is divided by the amount of substance, mass, or volume, thus the quantity is independent of the size or extent of the sample.

specific heat - heat capacity

 

Latent Heat of Vaporization

Phase changes - enthalpy of vaporization

In general, when a material changes phase from solid to liquid, or from liquid to gas a certain amount of energy is involved in this change of phase. In case of liquid to gas phase change, this amount of energy is known as the enthalpy of vaporization, (symbol ∆Hvap; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of vaporization or heat of evaporation. As an example, see the figure, which descibes phase transitions of water.

Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the gas (the pΔV work). When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of vaporization is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place.

Latent Heat of Fusion

In case of solid to liquid phase change, the change in enthalpy required to change its state is known as the enthalpy of fusion, (symbol ∆Hfus; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of fusion. Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the system (the pΔV work).

The liquid phase has a higher internal energy than the solid phase. This means energy must be supplied to a solid in order to melt it and energy is released from a liquid when it freezes, because the molecules in the liquid experience weaker intermolecular forces and so have a higher potential energy (a kind of bond-dissociation energy for intermolecular forces).

The temperature at which the phase transition occurs is the melting point.

When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of fusion is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place. By convention, the pressure is assumed to be 1 atm (101.325 kPa) unless otherwise specified.

heat of fusion and vaporization

Darmstadtium – Properties

ElementDarmstadtium
Atomic Number110
SymbolDs
Element CategoryTransition Metal
Phase at STPSynthetic
Atomic Mass [amu]281
Density at STP [g/cm3]
Electron Configuration[Rn] 5f14 6d8 7s2 ?
Possible Oxidation States
Electron Affinity [kJ/mol]
Electronegativity [Pauling scale]
1st Ionization Energy [eV]
Year of Discovery1994
DiscovererArmbruster, Paula & Muenzenberg, Dr. Gottfried
Thermal properties
Melting Point [Celsius scale]
Boiling Point [Celsius scale]
Thermal Conductivity [W/m K]
Specific Heat [J/g K]
Heat of Fusion [kJ/mol]
Heat of Vaporization [kJ/mol]

 

Darmstadtium in Periodic Table

Hydro­gen1HHe­lium2He
Lith­ium3LiBeryl­lium4BeBoron5BCarbon6CNitro­gen7NOxy­gen8OFluor­ine9FNeon10Ne
So­dium11NaMagne­sium12MgAlumin­ium13AlSili­con14SiPhos­phorus15PSulfur16SChlor­ine17ClArgon18Ar
Potas­sium19KCal­cium20CaScan­dium21ScTita­nium22TiVana­dium23VChrom­ium24CrManga­nese25MnIron26FeCobalt27CoNickel28NiCopper29CuZinc30ZnGallium31GaGerma­nium32GeArsenic33AsSele­nium34SeBromine35BrKryp­ton36Kr
Rubid­ium37RbStront­ium38SrYttrium39YZirco­nium40ZrNio­bium41NbMolyb­denum42MoTech­netium43TcRuthe­nium44RuRho­dium45RhPallad­ium46PdSilver47AgCad­mium48CdIndium49InTin50SnAnti­mony51SbTellur­ium52TeIodine53IXenon54Xe
Cae­sium55CsBa­rium56BaLan­thanum57La1 asteriskHaf­nium72HfTanta­lum73TaTung­sten74WRhe­nium75ReOs­mium76OsIridium77IrPlat­inum78PtGold79AuMer­cury80HgThallium81TlLead82PbBis­muth83BiPolo­nium84PoAsta­tine85AtRadon86Rn
Fran­cium87FrRa­dium88RaActin­ium89Ac1 asteriskRuther­fordium104RfDub­nium105DbSea­borgium106SgBohr­ium107BhHas­sium108HsMeit­nerium109MtDarm­stadtium110DsRoent­genium111RgCoper­nicium112CnNihon­ium113NhFlerov­ium114FlMoscov­ium115McLiver­morium116LvTenness­ine117TsOga­nesson118Og
1 asteriskCerium58CePraseo­dymium59PrNeo­dymium60NdProme­thium61PmSama­rium62SmEurop­ium63EuGadolin­ium64GdTer­bium65TbDyspro­sium66DyHol­mium67HoErbium68ErThulium69TmYtter­bium70YbLute­tium71Lu
1 asteriskThor­ium90ThProtac­tinium91PaUra­nium92UNeptu­nium93NpPluto­nium94PuAmeri­cium95AmCurium96CmBerkel­ium97BkCalifor­nium98CfEinstei­nium99EsFer­mium100FmMende­levium101MdNobel­ium102NoLawren­cium103Lr



Roentgenium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Roentgenium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Specific heat of Roentgenium is — J/g K.

Latent Heat of Fusion of Roentgenium is — kJ/mol.

Latent Heat of Vaporization of Roentgenium is — kJ/mol.

Specific Heat

Specific heat, or specific heat capacity, is a property related to internal energy that is very important in thermodynamics. The intensive properties cv and cp are defined for pure, simple compressible substances as partial derivatives of the internal energy u(T, v) and enthalpy h(T, p), respectively:

Specific Heat at Constant Volume and Constant Pressure

Table of specific heat capacitieswhere the subscripts v and p denote the variables held fixed during differentiation. The properties cv and cp are referred to as specific heats(or heat capacities) because under certain special conditions they relate the temperature change of a system to the amount of energy added by heat transfer. Their SI units are J/kg K or J/mol K.

Different substances are affected to different magnitudes by the addition of heat. When a given amount of heat is added to different substances, their temperatures increase by different amounts.

Heat capacity is an extensive property of matter, meaning it is proportional to the size of the system. Heat capacity C has the unit of energy per degree or energy per kelvin. When expressing the same phenomenon as an intensive property, the heat capacity is divided by the amount of substance, mass, or volume, thus the quantity is independent of the size or extent of the sample.

specific heat - heat capacity

 

Latent Heat of Vaporization

Phase changes - enthalpy of vaporization

In general, when a material changes phase from solid to liquid, or from liquid to gas a certain amount of energy is involved in this change of phase. In case of liquid to gas phase change, this amount of energy is known as the enthalpy of vaporization, (symbol ∆Hvap; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of vaporization or heat of evaporation. As an example, see the figure, which descibes phase transitions of water.

Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the gas (the pΔV work). When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of vaporization is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place.

Latent Heat of Fusion

In case of solid to liquid phase change, the change in enthalpy required to change its state is known as the enthalpy of fusion, (symbol ∆Hfus; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of fusion. Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the system (the pΔV work).

The liquid phase has a higher internal energy than the solid phase. This means energy must be supplied to a solid in order to melt it and energy is released from a liquid when it freezes, because the molecules in the liquid experience weaker intermolecular forces and so have a higher potential energy (a kind of bond-dissociation energy for intermolecular forces).

The temperature at which the phase transition occurs is the melting point.

When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of fusion is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place. By convention, the pressure is assumed to be 1 atm (101.325 kPa) unless otherwise specified.

heat of fusion and vaporization

Roentgenium – Properties

ElementRoentgenium
Atomic Number111
SymbolRg
Element CategoryTransition Metal
Phase at STPSynthetic
Atomic Mass [amu]272
Density at STP [g/cm3]
Electron Configuration[Rn] 5f14 6d9 7s2 ?
Possible Oxidation States
Electron Affinity [kJ/mol]
Electronegativity [Pauling scale]
1st Ionization Energy [eV]
Year of Discovery1994
DiscovererHofmann, Sigurd et. al.
Thermal properties
Melting Point [Celsius scale]
Boiling Point [Celsius scale]
Thermal Conductivity [W/m K]
Specific Heat [J/g K]
Heat of Fusion [kJ/mol]
Heat of Vaporization [kJ/mol]

 

Roentgenium in Periodic Table

Hydro­gen1HHe­lium2He
Lith­ium3LiBeryl­lium4BeBoron5BCarbon6CNitro­gen7NOxy­gen8OFluor­ine9FNeon10Ne
So­dium11NaMagne­sium12MgAlumin­ium13AlSili­con14SiPhos­phorus15PSulfur16SChlor­ine17ClArgon18Ar
Potas­sium19KCal­cium20CaScan­dium21ScTita­nium22TiVana­dium23VChrom­ium24CrManga­nese25MnIron26FeCobalt27CoNickel28NiCopper29CuZinc30ZnGallium31GaGerma­nium32GeArsenic33AsSele­nium34SeBromine35BrKryp­ton36Kr
Rubid­ium37RbStront­ium38SrYttrium39YZirco­nium40ZrNio­bium41NbMolyb­denum42MoTech­netium43TcRuthe­nium44RuRho­dium45RhPallad­ium46PdSilver47AgCad­mium48CdIndium49InTin50SnAnti­mony51SbTellur­ium52TeIodine53IXenon54Xe
Cae­sium55CsBa­rium56BaLan­thanum57La1 asteriskHaf­nium72HfTanta­lum73TaTung­sten74WRhe­nium75ReOs­mium76OsIridium77IrPlat­inum78PtGold79AuMer­cury80HgThallium81TlLead82PbBis­muth83BiPolo­nium84PoAsta­tine85AtRadon86Rn
Fran­cium87FrRa­dium88RaActin­ium89Ac1 asteriskRuther­fordium104RfDub­nium105DbSea­borgium106SgBohr­ium107BhHas­sium108HsMeit­nerium109MtDarm­stadtium110DsRoent­genium111RgCoper­nicium112CnNihon­ium113NhFlerov­ium114FlMoscov­ium115McLiver­morium116LvTenness­ine117TsOga­nesson118Og
1 asteriskCerium58CePraseo­dymium59PrNeo­dymium60NdProme­thium61PmSama­rium62SmEurop­ium63EuGadolin­ium64GdTer­bium65TbDyspro­sium66DyHol­mium67HoErbium68ErThulium69TmYtter­bium70YbLute­tium71Lu
1 asteriskThor­ium90ThProtac­tinium91PaUra­nium92UNeptu­nium93NpPluto­nium94PuAmeri­cium95AmCurium96CmBerkel­ium97BkCalifor­nium98CfEinstei­nium99EsFer­mium100FmMende­levium101MdNobel­ium102NoLawren­cium103Lr



Mendelevium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Mendelevium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Specific heat of Mendelevium is — J/g K.

Latent Heat of Fusion of Mendelevium is — kJ/mol.

Latent Heat of Vaporization of Mendelevium is — kJ/mol.

Specific Heat

Specific heat, or specific heat capacity, is a property related to internal energy that is very important in thermodynamics. The intensive properties cv and cp are defined for pure, simple compressible substances as partial derivatives of the internal energy u(T, v) and enthalpy h(T, p), respectively:

Specific Heat at Constant Volume and Constant Pressure

Table of specific heat capacitieswhere the subscripts v and p denote the variables held fixed during differentiation. The properties cv and cp are referred to as specific heats(or heat capacities) because under certain special conditions they relate the temperature change of a system to the amount of energy added by heat transfer. Their SI units are J/kg K or J/mol K.

Different substances are affected to different magnitudes by the addition of heat. When a given amount of heat is added to different substances, their temperatures increase by different amounts.

Heat capacity is an extensive property of matter, meaning it is proportional to the size of the system. Heat capacity C has the unit of energy per degree or energy per kelvin. When expressing the same phenomenon as an intensive property, the heat capacity is divided by the amount of substance, mass, or volume, thus the quantity is independent of the size or extent of the sample.

specific heat - heat capacity

 

Latent Heat of Vaporization

Phase changes - enthalpy of vaporization

In general, when a material changes phase from solid to liquid, or from liquid to gas a certain amount of energy is involved in this change of phase. In case of liquid to gas phase change, this amount of energy is known as the enthalpy of vaporization, (symbol ∆Hvap; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of vaporization or heat of evaporation. As an example, see the figure, which descibes phase transitions of water.

Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the gas (the pΔV work). When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of vaporization is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place.

Latent Heat of Fusion

In case of solid to liquid phase change, the change in enthalpy required to change its state is known as the enthalpy of fusion, (symbol ∆Hfus; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of fusion. Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the system (the pΔV work).

The liquid phase has a higher internal energy than the solid phase. This means energy must be supplied to a solid in order to melt it and energy is released from a liquid when it freezes, because the molecules in the liquid experience weaker intermolecular forces and so have a higher potential energy (a kind of bond-dissociation energy for intermolecular forces).

The temperature at which the phase transition occurs is the melting point.

When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of fusion is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place. By convention, the pressure is assumed to be 1 atm (101.325 kPa) unless otherwise specified.

heat of fusion and vaporization

Mendelevium – Properties

ElementMendelevium
Atomic Number101
SymbolMd
Element CategoryRare Earth Metal
Phase at STPSynthetic
Atomic Mass [amu]258
Density at STP [g/cm3]
Electron Configuration[Rn] 5f13 7s2
Possible Oxidation States+2,3
Electron Affinity [kJ/mol]
Electronegativity [Pauling scale]1.3
1st Ionization Energy [eV]6.58
Year of Discovery1955
DiscovererStanley G. Thompson, Glenn T. Seaborg, Bernard G. Harvey, Gregory R. Choppin, Albert Ghiorso
Thermal properties
Melting Point [Celsius scale]827
Boiling Point [Celsius scale]
Thermal Conductivity [W/m K]
Specific Heat [J/g K]
Heat of Fusion [kJ/mol]
Heat of Vaporization [kJ/mol]

 

Mendelevium in Periodic Table

Hydro­gen1HHe­lium2He
Lith­ium3LiBeryl­lium4BeBoron5BCarbon6CNitro­gen7NOxy­gen8OFluor­ine9FNeon10Ne
So­dium11NaMagne­sium12MgAlumin­ium13AlSili­con14SiPhos­phorus15PSulfur16SChlor­ine17ClArgon18Ar
Potas­sium19KCal­cium20CaScan­dium21ScTita­nium22TiVana­dium23VChrom­ium24CrManga­nese25MnIron26FeCobalt27CoNickel28NiCopper29CuZinc30ZnGallium31GaGerma­nium32GeArsenic33AsSele­nium34SeBromine35BrKryp­ton36Kr
Rubid­ium37RbStront­ium38SrYttrium39YZirco­nium40ZrNio­bium41NbMolyb­denum42MoTech­netium43TcRuthe­nium44RuRho­dium45RhPallad­ium46PdSilver47AgCad­mium48CdIndium49InTin50SnAnti­mony51SbTellur­ium52TeIodine53IXenon54Xe
Cae­sium55CsBa­rium56BaLan­thanum57La1 asteriskHaf­nium72HfTanta­lum73TaTung­sten74WRhe­nium75ReOs­mium76OsIridium77IrPlat­inum78PtGold79AuMer­cury80HgThallium81TlLead82PbBis­muth83BiPolo­nium84PoAsta­tine85AtRadon86Rn
Fran­cium87FrRa­dium88RaActin­ium89Ac1 asteriskRuther­fordium104RfDub­nium105DbSea­borgium106SgBohr­ium107BhHas­sium108HsMeit­nerium109MtDarm­stadtium110DsRoent­genium111RgCoper­nicium112CnNihon­ium113NhFlerov­ium114FlMoscov­ium115McLiver­morium116LvTenness­ine117TsOga­nesson118Og
1 asteriskCerium58CePraseo­dymium59PrNeo­dymium60NdProme­thium61PmSama­rium62SmEurop­ium63EuGadolin­ium64GdTer­bium65TbDyspro­sium66DyHol­mium67HoErbium68ErThulium69TmYtter­bium70YbLute­tium71Lu
1 asteriskThor­ium90ThProtac­tinium91PaUra­nium92UNeptu­nium93NpPluto­nium94PuAmeri­cium95AmCurium96CmBerkel­ium97BkCalifor­nium98CfEinstei­nium99EsFer­mium100FmMende­levium101MdNobel­ium102NoLawren­cium103Lr



Copernicium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Copernicium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Specific heat of Copernicium is — J/g K.

Latent Heat of Fusion of Copernicium is — kJ/mol.

Latent Heat of Vaporization of Copernicium is — kJ/mol.

Specific Heat

Specific heat, or specific heat capacity, is a property related to internal energy that is very important in thermodynamics. The intensive properties cv and cp are defined for pure, simple compressible substances as partial derivatives of the internal energy u(T, v) and enthalpy h(T, p), respectively:

Specific Heat at Constant Volume and Constant Pressure

Table of specific heat capacitieswhere the subscripts v and p denote the variables held fixed during differentiation. The properties cv and cp are referred to as specific heats(or heat capacities) because under certain special conditions they relate the temperature change of a system to the amount of energy added by heat transfer. Their SI units are J/kg K or J/mol K.

Different substances are affected to different magnitudes by the addition of heat. When a given amount of heat is added to different substances, their temperatures increase by different amounts.

Heat capacity is an extensive property of matter, meaning it is proportional to the size of the system. Heat capacity C has the unit of energy per degree or energy per kelvin. When expressing the same phenomenon as an intensive property, the heat capacity is divided by the amount of substance, mass, or volume, thus the quantity is independent of the size or extent of the sample.

specific heat - heat capacity

 

Latent Heat of Vaporization

Phase changes - enthalpy of vaporization

In general, when a material changes phase from solid to liquid, or from liquid to gas a certain amount of energy is involved in this change of phase. In case of liquid to gas phase change, this amount of energy is known as the enthalpy of vaporization, (symbol ∆Hvap; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of vaporization or heat of evaporation. As an example, see the figure, which descibes phase transitions of water.

Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the gas (the pΔV work). When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of vaporization is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place.

Latent Heat of Fusion

In case of solid to liquid phase change, the change in enthalpy required to change its state is known as the enthalpy of fusion, (symbol ∆Hfus; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of fusion. Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the system (the pΔV work).

The liquid phase has a higher internal energy than the solid phase. This means energy must be supplied to a solid in order to melt it and energy is released from a liquid when it freezes, because the molecules in the liquid experience weaker intermolecular forces and so have a higher potential energy (a kind of bond-dissociation energy for intermolecular forces).

The temperature at which the phase transition occurs is the melting point.

When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of fusion is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place. By convention, the pressure is assumed to be 1 atm (101.325 kPa) unless otherwise specified.

heat of fusion and vaporization

Copernicium – Properties

ElementCopernicium
Atomic Number112
SymbolCn
Element CategoryTransition Metal
Phase at STPSynthetic
Atomic Mass [amu]285
Density at STP [g/cm3]
Electron Configuration[Rn] 5f14 6d10 7s2 ?
Possible Oxidation States
Electron Affinity [kJ/mol]
Electronegativity [Pauling scale]
1st Ionization Energy [eV]
Year of Discovery1996
DiscovererArmbruster, Paula & Muenzenberg, Dr. Gottfried
Thermal properties
Melting Point [Celsius scale]
Boiling Point [Celsius scale]
Thermal Conductivity [W/m K]
Specific Heat [J/g K]
Heat of Fusion [kJ/mol]
Heat of Vaporization [kJ/mol]

 

Copernicium in Periodic Table

Hydro­gen1HHe­lium2He
Lith­ium3LiBeryl­lium4BeBoron5BCarbon6CNitro­gen7NOxy­gen8OFluor­ine9FNeon10Ne
So­dium11NaMagne­sium12MgAlumin­ium13AlSili­con14SiPhos­phorus15PSulfur16SChlor­ine17ClArgon18Ar
Potas­sium19KCal­cium20CaScan­dium21ScTita­nium22TiVana­dium23VChrom­ium24CrManga­nese25MnIron26FeCobalt27CoNickel28NiCopper29CuZinc30ZnGallium31GaGerma­nium32GeArsenic33AsSele­nium34SeBromine35BrKryp­ton36Kr
Rubid­ium37RbStront­ium38SrYttrium39YZirco­nium40ZrNio­bium41NbMolyb­denum42MoTech­netium43TcRuthe­nium44RuRho­dium45RhPallad­ium46PdSilver47AgCad­mium48CdIndium49InTin50SnAnti­mony51SbTellur­ium52TeIodine53IXenon54Xe
Cae­sium55CsBa­rium56BaLan­thanum57La1 asteriskHaf­nium72HfTanta­lum73TaTung­sten74WRhe­nium75ReOs­mium76OsIridium77IrPlat­inum78PtGold79AuMer­cury80HgThallium81TlLead82PbBis­muth83BiPolo­nium84PoAsta­tine85AtRadon86Rn
Fran­cium87FrRa­dium88RaActin­ium89Ac1 asteriskRuther­fordium104RfDub­nium105DbSea­borgium106SgBohr­ium107BhHas­sium108HsMeit­nerium109MtDarm­stadtium110DsRoent­genium111RgCoper­nicium112CnNihon­ium113NhFlerov­ium114FlMoscov­ium115McLiver­morium116LvTenness­ine117TsOga­nesson118Og
1 asteriskCerium58CePraseo­dymium59PrNeo­dymium60NdProme­thium61PmSama­rium62SmEurop­ium63EuGadolin­ium64GdTer­bium65TbDyspro­sium66DyHol­mium67HoErbium68ErThulium69TmYtter­bium70YbLute­tium71Lu
1 asteriskThor­ium90ThProtac­tinium91PaUra­nium92UNeptu­nium93NpPluto­nium94PuAmeri­cium95AmCurium96CmBerkel­ium97BkCalifor­nium98CfEinstei­nium99EsFer­mium100FmMende­levium101MdNobel­ium102NoLawren­cium103Lr



Nobelium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Nobelium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Specific heat of Nobelium is — J/g K.

Latent Heat of Fusion of Nobelium is — kJ/mol.

Latent Heat of Vaporization of Nobelium is — kJ/mol.

Specific Heat

Specific heat, or specific heat capacity, is a property related to internal energy that is very important in thermodynamics. The intensive properties cv and cp are defined for pure, simple compressible substances as partial derivatives of the internal energy u(T, v) and enthalpy h(T, p), respectively:

Specific Heat at Constant Volume and Constant Pressure

Table of specific heat capacitieswhere the subscripts v and p denote the variables held fixed during differentiation. The properties cv and cp are referred to as specific heats(or heat capacities) because under certain special conditions they relate the temperature change of a system to the amount of energy added by heat transfer. Their SI units are J/kg K or J/mol K.

Different substances are affected to different magnitudes by the addition of heat. When a given amount of heat is added to different substances, their temperatures increase by different amounts.

Heat capacity is an extensive property of matter, meaning it is proportional to the size of the system. Heat capacity C has the unit of energy per degree or energy per kelvin. When expressing the same phenomenon as an intensive property, the heat capacity is divided by the amount of substance, mass, or volume, thus the quantity is independent of the size or extent of the sample.

specific heat - heat capacity

 

Latent Heat of Vaporization

Phase changes - enthalpy of vaporization

In general, when a material changes phase from solid to liquid, or from liquid to gas a certain amount of energy is involved in this change of phase. In case of liquid to gas phase change, this amount of energy is known as the enthalpy of vaporization, (symbol ∆Hvap; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of vaporization or heat of evaporation. As an example, see the figure, which descibes phase transitions of water.

Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the gas (the pΔV work). When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of vaporization is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place.

Latent Heat of Fusion

In case of solid to liquid phase change, the change in enthalpy required to change its state is known as the enthalpy of fusion, (symbol ∆Hfus; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of fusion. Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the system (the pΔV work).

The liquid phase has a higher internal energy than the solid phase. This means energy must be supplied to a solid in order to melt it and energy is released from a liquid when it freezes, because the molecules in the liquid experience weaker intermolecular forces and so have a higher potential energy (a kind of bond-dissociation energy for intermolecular forces).

The temperature at which the phase transition occurs is the melting point.

When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of fusion is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place. By convention, the pressure is assumed to be 1 atm (101.325 kPa) unless otherwise specified.

heat of fusion and vaporization

Nobelium – Properties

ElementNobelium
Atomic Number102
SymbolNo
Element CategoryRare Earth Metal
Phase at STPSynthetic
Atomic Mass [amu]259
Density at STP [g/cm3]
Electron Configuration[Rn] 5f14 7s2
Possible Oxidation States+2,3
Electron Affinity [kJ/mol]
Electronegativity [Pauling scale]1.3
1st Ionization Energy [eV]6.65
Year of Discovery1958
DiscovererAlbert Ghiorso, Glenn T. Seaborg, Torbørn Sikkeland, John R. Walton
Thermal properties
Melting Point [Celsius scale]827
Boiling Point [Celsius scale]
Thermal Conductivity [W/m K]
Specific Heat [J/g K]
Heat of Fusion [kJ/mol]
Heat of Vaporization [kJ/mol]

 

Nobelium in Periodic Table

Hydro­gen1HHe­lium2He
Lith­ium3LiBeryl­lium4BeBoron5BCarbon6CNitro­gen7NOxy­gen8OFluor­ine9FNeon10Ne
So­dium11NaMagne­sium12MgAlumin­ium13AlSili­con14SiPhos­phorus15PSulfur16SChlor­ine17ClArgon18Ar
Potas­sium19KCal­cium20CaScan­dium21ScTita­nium22TiVana­dium23VChrom­ium24CrManga­nese25MnIron26FeCobalt27CoNickel28NiCopper29CuZinc30ZnGallium31GaGerma­nium32GeArsenic33AsSele­nium34SeBromine35BrKryp­ton36Kr
Rubid­ium37RbStront­ium38SrYttrium39YZirco­nium40ZrNio­bium41NbMolyb­denum42MoTech­netium43TcRuthe­nium44RuRho­dium45RhPallad­ium46PdSilver47AgCad­mium48CdIndium49InTin50SnAnti­mony51SbTellur­ium52TeIodine53IXenon54Xe
Cae­sium55CsBa­rium56BaLan­thanum57La1 asteriskHaf­nium72HfTanta­lum73TaTung­sten74WRhe­nium75ReOs­mium76OsIridium77IrPlat­inum78PtGold79AuMer­cury80HgThallium81TlLead82PbBis­muth83BiPolo­nium84PoAsta­tine85AtRadon86Rn
Fran­cium87FrRa­dium88RaActin­ium89Ac1 asteriskRuther­fordium104RfDub­nium105DbSea­borgium106SgBohr­ium107BhHas­sium108HsMeit­nerium109MtDarm­stadtium110DsRoent­genium111RgCoper­nicium112CnNihon­ium113NhFlerov­ium114FlMoscov­ium115McLiver­morium116LvTenness­ine117TsOga­nesson118Og
1 asteriskCerium58CePraseo­dymium59PrNeo­dymium60NdProme­thium61PmSama­rium62SmEurop­ium63EuGadolin­ium64GdTer­bium65TbDyspro­sium66DyHol­mium67HoErbium68ErThulium69TmYtter­bium70YbLute­tium71Lu
1 asteriskThor­ium90ThProtac­tinium91PaUra­nium92UNeptu­nium93NpPluto­nium94PuAmeri­cium95AmCurium96CmBerkel­ium97BkCalifor­nium98CfEinstei­nium99EsFer­mium100FmMende­levium101MdNobel­ium102NoLawren­cium103Lr



Nihonium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Nihonium – Specific Heat, Latent Heat of Fusion, Latent Heat of Vaporization

Specific heat of Nihonium is — J/g K.

Latent Heat of Fusion of Nihonium is — kJ/mol.

Latent Heat of Vaporization of Nihonium is — kJ/mol.

Specific Heat

Specific heat, or specific heat capacity, is a property related to internal energy that is very important in thermodynamics. The intensive properties cv and cp are defined for pure, simple compressible substances as partial derivatives of the internal energy u(T, v) and enthalpy h(T, p), respectively:

Specific Heat at Constant Volume and Constant Pressure

Table of specific heat capacitieswhere the subscripts v and p denote the variables held fixed during differentiation. The properties cv and cp are referred to as specific heats(or heat capacities) because under certain special conditions they relate the temperature change of a system to the amount of energy added by heat transfer. Their SI units are J/kg K or J/mol K.

Different substances are affected to different magnitudes by the addition of heat. When a given amount of heat is added to different substances, their temperatures increase by different amounts.

Heat capacity is an extensive property of matter, meaning it is proportional to the size of the system. Heat capacity C has the unit of energy per degree or energy per kelvin. When expressing the same phenomenon as an intensive property, the heat capacity is divided by the amount of substance, mass, or volume, thus the quantity is independent of the size or extent of the sample.

specific heat - heat capacity

 

Latent Heat of Vaporization

Phase changes - enthalpy of vaporization

In general, when a material changes phase from solid to liquid, or from liquid to gas a certain amount of energy is involved in this change of phase. In case of liquid to gas phase change, this amount of energy is known as the enthalpy of vaporization, (symbol ∆Hvap; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of vaporization or heat of evaporation. As an example, see the figure, which descibes phase transitions of water.

Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the gas (the pΔV work). When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of vaporization is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place.

Latent Heat of Fusion

In case of solid to liquid phase change, the change in enthalpy required to change its state is known as the enthalpy of fusion, (symbol ∆Hfus; unit: J) also known as the (latent) heat of fusion. Latent heat is the amount of heat added to or removed from a substance to produce a change in phase. This energy breaks down the intermolecular attractive forces, and also must provide the energy necessary to expand the system (the pΔV work).

The liquid phase has a higher internal energy than the solid phase. This means energy must be supplied to a solid in order to melt it and energy is released from a liquid when it freezes, because the molecules in the liquid experience weaker intermolecular forces and so have a higher potential energy (a kind of bond-dissociation energy for intermolecular forces).

The temperature at which the phase transition occurs is the melting point.

When latent heat is added, no temperature change occurs. The enthalpy of fusion is a function of the pressure at which that transformation takes place. By convention, the pressure is assumed to be 1 atm (101.325 kPa) unless otherwise specified.

heat of fusion and vaporization

Nihonium – Properties

ElementNihonium
Atomic Number113
SymbolNh
Element CategoryPost-Transition Metal
Phase at STPSynthetic
Atomic Mass [amu]286
Density at STP [g/cm3]
Electron Configuration[Rn] 5f14 6d10 7s2 7p1 ?
Possible Oxidation States
Electron Affinity [kJ/mol]
Electronegativity [Pauling scale]
1st Ionization Energy [eV]
Year of Discovery2004
DiscovererY. T. Oganessian et. al.
Thermal properties
Melting Point [Celsius scale]
Boiling Point [Celsius scale]
Thermal Conductivity [W/m K]
Specific Heat [J/g K]
Heat of Fusion [kJ/mol]
Heat of Vaporization [kJ/mol]

 

Nihonium in Periodic Table

Hydro­gen1HHe­lium2He
Lith­ium3LiBeryl­lium4BeBoron5BCarbon6CNitro­gen7NOxy­gen8OFluor­ine9FNeon10Ne
So­dium11NaMagne­sium12MgAlumin­ium13AlSili­con14SiPhos­phorus15PSulfur16SChlor­ine17ClArgon18Ar
Potas­sium19KCal­cium20CaScan­dium21ScTita­nium22TiVana­dium23VChrom­ium24CrManga­nese25MnIron26FeCobalt27CoNickel28NiCopper29CuZinc30ZnGallium31GaGerma­nium32GeArsenic33As